Essay in Freedom of Holly Golightly

Freedom of Holly Golightly

Freedom of Holly Golightly

The novel " Breakfast by Tiffany's, ” by Truman Capote, is approximately a story among an unnamed narrator who becomes good friends with a gold digger named Holly Golightly in 43. Freedom is definitely a important element in the story to get the main character. The author symbolizes the freedom of Holly by causing metaphors inside the story and showing her the point of watch about flexibility.

Inside the story, Holly needs a large amount of freedom because the unnamed narrator points out. The initial metaphor that represents the freedom of Holly is the parrot cage. The narrator explains that Holly " couldn't keep to see whatever in a cage” by staying away from the visit to the tiergarten and this sentence represents the meaningful of freedom to Holly (43). A crate is supposed to provide an animal inside but Holly cannot keep to see it because she feels that she lacks of freedom inside of a cage. Holly is fear to be imprison by somebody just as the case of a cage. The animal inside cage cannot move around which usually prevents the dog from freedom. After, the narrator and Holly discover another bird cage within an antique shop and Holly enjoys to find the cage nevertheless after she says " But nonetheless, it's a cage” and this comment makes the readers to understand that even if the cage is very fabulous, Holly are unable to bear to lose freedom (44). This time, the cage is good for birds, so it represents more freedom because a bird in an exceedingly cage cannot fly readily around the world. The case of the chicken is just like the life span of Holly because Holly is a lady that wants to travel around and the girl cannot be inside of a cage where she are unable to do no matter what she would like. Holly did buy a bird crate for the unnamed narrator and she also says " Promise beneath the thick put a full time income thing in it” and this passing shows that freedom for Holly is very important just like the two estimates during the day of Holly and the narrator (47). Holly also enjoys her liberty because she's always able to travel around with her " luggage and unpacked crates” devoid of...

Cited: Capote, Truman. Lunch break at Tiffany's. New York: Antique Books, 2012. Print.